Addition to best Teacher Anxiety Dream

More anxiety dreams. This time it was a back-to-school night in a building I didn’t recognize and Marcus Foster’s dad was here to see me and I didn’t teach a Marcus Foster but I wasn’t sure that I didn’t teach a Marcus Foster so I was walking with this officious Dad (think short, white, obnoxious, glasses, he reminded me of a dentist, didn’t recognize him)  racking my brain trying to figure out if his son was one of my students and he didn’t have a mask on and neither did I because I had a pen in my mouth and then I took the pen out and couldn’t find my mask and we were walking through crowds of parents and they didn’t have masks on either.  We got to my room — old room 113 at West Philly High but somehow now within a downtown office building — and I woke up.   

(Note: Marcus Foster had been principal at Gratz (where I student taught) and then became the superintendent of Oakland Schools.  Sad coda: he was a victim of SLA, no, not that SLA, the Symbionese Liberation Army. Why that  name bubbled up in my subconscious, I don’t know.)   

Great headline

White clicktivism: why are some Americans woke online but not in real life? And a solid article as well.

I’m trying to think whether I might use this in English — alongside Ta-Nehisi Coates — or whether I want to use it in history.

Quoting:

“Following the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, many white Americans have spent the past year taking part in a social justice movement online and on the ground, combating systemic racism and opposing police brutality. Bookstores sold out of race education books, social media timelines were consumed with Black Lives Matter support, and protests drew diverse crowds.

But then we saw the election results. Trump won the support of 71 million Americans this year – including 55% of white women and 61% of white men. Even in liberal hotbeds like New York, California and Washington, Trump maintained 48%, 47%, and 36% of the white vote.”

Yo-Yo Ma

Great interview.

For me as a musician, I try to be aware of where I am. As a performer, my job is to make the listener the most important person in the room. The only way to avoid burnout is to care about where you are. My good friend Manny Ax12 would always say to me that it doesn’t matter what you did yesterday; if you’re here today, that’s what counts. Being present. Caring. You’re working with living material. That goes back to memory. The living material is only living if it is memorable. Not only that it’s memorable but that you pass it on. That is what I’m thinking about with every single interaction. Whether it’s a kid, someone on the street, in a concert hall or with you, David. It’s the same thing: How to be present. Because if you’re not?

Re-written:

For me as a teacher, I try to be aware of where I am. As a teacher, my job is to make the students the most important people in the room. The only way to avoid burnout is to care about where you are. My good friend Manny Ax12 would always say to me that it doesn’t matter what you did yesterday; if you’re here today, that’s what counts. Being present. Caring. You’re working with living material. That goes back to memory. The living material is only living if it is memorable. Not only that it’s memorable but that you pass it on. That is what I’m thinking about with every single interaction. Whether it’s a student, someone on the street, in a school or with you, David. It’s the same thing: How to be present. Because if you’re not?

Thoughtful article

What if Instead of Calling People Out, We Called Them In?

Not sure why this is in the style section, but glad it got published.

“The antidote to that outrage cycle, Professor Ross believes, is “calling in.” Calling in is like calling out, but done privately and with respect. “It’s a call out done with love,” she said. That may mean simply sending someone a private message, or even ringing them on the telephone (!) to discuss the matter, or simply taking a breath before commenting, screen-shotting or demanding one “do better” without explaining how.

Calling out assumes the worst. Calling in involves conversation, compassion and context. It doesn’t mean a person should ignore harm, slight or damage, but nor should she, he or they exaggerate it.